G. Ustvolskaya


See 1
 

1930s
 

end of 1930s
 

See 2
 

1940s
 

1952
 

Sortavala, '55
 

1955
 

See 3
 

1977
 

See 6
 

See 6

See 7

See 7. G. Ustvolskaya, A. Rudin

See 8

See 9

See 9

See 5

See 4

1. Father, Ivan Mihailovich Ustvolsky
2. Moscow, "Concerto for piano and orchestra". Ustvolskaya, Serebryakov
3. G. Ustvolskaya and A. Jansons, the Great hall of the Leningrad Philharmonia. The photograph is taken from "The Soviet Music" magazine, № 10, 1966
4. St. Petersburg, Volkov Lutheran cemetery, 11th sector. Photo: Sergey Tolstyh, 2006.
5. This is the nearest church to the house of G. Ustvolskaya. Though she loved to admire it while taking a stroll, she went inside only once. On one occasion, she speculated: "will it be possible in the future to perform my music there?" When asked why she favoured this church in particular, she replied "because there's only room for a few people and a crowd might not appreciate it.". Photo: Andrei Bakhmin, 2009.
6. Prienai (Lithuania), 1970s. Photo: Kontantin Bagrenin
7. The Hermitage theater, St. Petersburg, the concert dedicated to 85 years to G. Ustvolskaya, 2004. Photo: Valery Pavlov.
8. The Hermitage theater, 2004. Sitting from left to right: К. Rybakov, G. Ustvolskaya, A. Lyubimov, A. Trostyansky. Standing: A. Belonenko, V. Pavlov (two festival's organizers), A. Rudin, two German performers
9. Screenshots from the silent newsreel of 1959 - the only known video of Galina Ustvolskaya made before 1990s.

Amsterdam


See 1

See 1

See 4

See 4

See 4

See 2

With Viktor Suslin, 1995
 

With Viktor Suslin, May 2005
 

See 5
With Hans-Ulrich Duffek (Sikorski)

See 5
 

See 3
 

See 3
 

This row see 3

 

 

 

 

 

1. With Reinbert de Leeuw in his house, 1995. Ustvolskaya's first visit abroad was to Amsterdam in 1995 for the world premiere of her Third Symphony, conducted by Valery Gergiev. She returned to Amsterdam in 1996, 1997 and 2005. Photo: Viktor Suslin.
2. G. Ustvolskaya with M. Rostropovitch. The Amsterdam Concertgebouw, January 6, 1996. Photo by Marcel Molle.
See also G. Ustvolskaya, applauded by M. Rostropovitch and R. de Leeuw in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, January 6, 1996. Photo by Marcel Molle published in De Volkskrant.
3. The rehearsal of the Second Symphony's world premiere in 2005 in Hilversum. Photo: Leendert Jansen, reproduced by kind permission. When Reinbert de Leeuw completed his recording of Ustvolskaya's most important work — the Second Symphony, she was fully satisfied and gratefully commented: "my life was worthwhile".
4. Together with Reinbert de Leeuw. Photo: Robert Schlingemann, 1995
5. Keukenhof (Garden of Europe), Lisse. Photo: Viktor Suslin, 2005
 

Apartment


See 9
 

See 9
 

See 1
 

See 2
 

See 2
 

See 3
 

See 3
 

See 4
 

See 5
 

See 6
 

See 7
 

See 8
 

1. The cube (43cm x 43cm) designed by Ustvolskaya for her Second Composition. She could not find an appropriate material until discovering chipboard. The tuning fork indicates the scale of the cube: the handle and signature were added when the cube traveled to Amsterdam in 1995. For more details on this unique instrument please see this article.
2. The tuning fork was used by Ustvolskaya as a key to open a hidden door which concealed her electricity supply meter.
3. The cover of a pre-revolutionary album atop which Ustvolskaya set down her scores. Once she was presented a new, purpose-made wooden board for writing. She could not adjust to it, and continued to use the album.
4. Water damage from neighbouring apartments damaged the ceiling and the walls near Ustvolskaya's bed.
5. A shelf of books by Lermontov and Li Bai, whose poetry Ustvolskaya particularly admired and knew by heart.
6. The radio on the kitchen was only ever turned on for the weather forecast. The wooden figures around it were collected by Ustvolskaya.
7. The clock that showed the same time for years: 12:20. Upon Ustvolskaya's death (which took place at 13:00), it changed its time to that of her final moment, without anyone present.
8. Teddy, Ustvolskaya's favourite toy — a cherished gift in her later years.
9. Home interior on Gagarin prosp., where Ustvolskaya lived since 1968. The TV-set went out of order soon after it was bought and stood as a piece of furniture, besides Ustvolskaya had never watched TV. Photo: Josee Voormans, 1998.
* Photographs 1–8 by Andrei Bakhmin (2010). More photographs.

Pavlovsk and its surroundings

Manuscripts


First Symphony

First Symphony

First Symphony pp. 1—2

Second Symphony

Second Symphony p. 42

Third Symphony

Third Symphony p. 25

Composition N 1 p. 2

Composition N 1 p. 23

Composition N 3

Composition N 3 p. 1

Composition N 3 p. 29

Third Sonata p.1

Fifth Sonata p.5

Sixth Sonata p.1

Scores


See 1
 

The first ed. of the
Fourth Symphony 1991

The first ed. of
Octet 1972

The first ed. of the
Second Sonata 1969

Second Sonata,
p. 1, 1969

Fourth Sonata
p. 13, 1987

Sixth Sonata
 

See 2
 

1. The first edition of the First Symphony (published in an edition of 205 copies) with the censorship stamp: "Verified. Permitted to see daylight."
2. "To Dear Galya Ustvolskaya from D. Shostakovich. 18 III 1955 Leningrad"



© 2009—2017 ustvolskaya.org
When using any materials from this site, please provide a credit and a link to its original location.